Cinelli Vigorelli

Ever since I got into fixed gear bikes back in 2010, the Cinelli Vigorelli has been an icon of the single gear world.

img_5017

Its impact on the fixed gear scene was huge: when people were still riding old steel frames, Cinelli came out with a modern frame that literally everyone wanted (myself included). It was light and quite stiff, and, most importantly, had a killer design and awesome colours. At the time, those were the key features that we all cared about, as evident by the growing number of Cinelli bikes you’d see on the streets.

img_5014

Then, after a few years, I personally became a bit tired of being visually bombarded by these frames. The fixed gear wave was growing day by day, and with an incredible number of new designs appearing by the minute, the Vigorelli was starting to look like an item from the past. Since its inception, there has only been one significant upgrade – the tapered headtube they released in 2015. And in a world where looks are everything, the fixed gear community quickly lost interest.

img_5013

img_5023

img_5015

img_5022

img_5016

img_5020

img_5026

img_5029

However, I have to admit that this particular Cinelli stands out for a number of reasons.

Firstly, the elegance and discreteness are enough to capture my attention, which sounds strange because we are dealing with the Caleido version. But just look at the full black setup: it reminds me of the cleanliness and starkness found in racing cars, with no added frills other than what is strictly needed to own it on the track.

It may appear like any other standard bike at first sight, but a deeper look at the high-end components (Fizik Volta R1, Dura Ace hubs, Sugino 75 on Factory5 Lattice, Thomson stem and seatpost) unvils its true colours. Here stands a machine built to go fast rather than merely pose around in the streets.

img_5012

img_5010

Words by @alvuz
Photos by @daam